Hiroshige, 100 Views of Edo

Genre : Subjects, Tags : Hiroshige

The book written by Melanie Trede you should read is Hiroshige, 100 Views of Edo. I'm sure you'll love the subject inside of Hiroshige, 100 Views of Edo. You will have enough time to read all 294 pages in your spare time. The manufacturer who released this beautiful book is Taschen. Get the Hiroshige, 100 Views of Edo now, you will not be disappointed with the content. You can download Hiroshige, 100 Views of Edo to your computer with easy steps.

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Book's Details
Cover of Hiroshige, 100 Views of Edo

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Hiroshige's Edo: Masterful ukiyo-e woodblock prints of Tokyo in the mid-19th century Literally meaning ""pictures of the floating world,"" [b]ukiyo-e refers to the famous Japanese woodblock print genre[/b] that originated in the 17th century and is practically synonymous with the Western world's visual characterization of Japan. Because they could be mass produced, ukiyo-e works were often used as designs for fans, New Year's greeting cards, single prints, and book illustrations, and traditionally they depicted city life, entertainment, beautiful women, kabuki actors, and landscapes. The influence of ukiyo-e in Europe and the USA, often referred to as Japonisme, can be seen in everything from impressionist painting to today's manga and anime illustration. This reprint is made from one of the finest complete original set of woodprints belonging to the Ota Memorial Museum of Art in Tokyo.. Here are the detailed information about Hiroshige, 100 Views of Edo as your reference.

Original Title:Hiroshige, 100 Views of Edo
ISBN:3822848271
Author:Melanie Trede
Pages:294 pages
Editor:Taschen
User Rating:4.6 stars of 5 from 239 Users
Filename:hiroshige-100-views-of-edo.pdf (Current server's speed 18.61 Mbps)
Filesize:18.23 MB
Book's Review

Uncropped images - 36 of 36 people found the following review helpful.Uncropped images By M Yes, there are cropped images at the start of this huge and beautiful book to add illustrations to the informative introduction, but the main body of this publication is made up of full size, uncropped excellent reproductions of all 118 of the "100 Views". I give it the full 5 stars for the Japanese style binding, single sided printing and silk effect covered portfolio slipcase... and it's uncropped reproductions.
100 years of Edo - 5 of 6 people found the following review helpful.100 years of Edo By Lisa Gregory This book is probably one of my most treasured books that I own. Its giant and oversized cover is printedsatin that folds like a box and the actual art book has a cloth soft bound cover with two little bone clasps on the side. Just the thought and finishing details that went into the production of this book makes it one of the nicer art books out there. There is also yet another simple brown cardboard box to house the satin finished cover for the actual book. Pretty nice I think, to include another box to protect the cover. The photos are full sized and each and everyone is a real beauty. This book makes a great gift for anyone who likes the work of Hiroshige orJapanese art in general.
Gorgeous! - 27 of 27 people found the following review helpful.Gorgeous! By LKP Gorgeous, stunning large-scale book, and an excellent addition to any art book collection - or for the coffee table. Perfect reference companion for reading with other in-depth Hiroshige books (I confess, yes! Art Historian. LOL). Softcover with traditional rope binding. Protected in a silk hardcover folding case fastened by faux ivory clasps. My pics hopefully show better than my description. The detailing - binding, paper quality, plates - is exquisite. Colors and images are precise.Complete collection of FULL-PLATE UNCROPPED prints with museum-like blurbs, succinct but fairly informative, (and a wee bit snarky in places) on the opposite page in English, German, and French. Brief introductory overview with zoomed-in detailing of selected prints. Brings back nice memories for us, having seen some of these prints on display during our visit to the Ota Memorial Museum in Nov 2008.